The Chancellor should continue to let the deficit take the strain

On Wednesday (25th) the Chancellor will announce the results of a one-year Spending Review, setting departmental limits for 2021-22. This will not be a full Budget – let alone a multi-year programme of tax increases or spending cuts. But there is still a huge amount of (mostly unhelpful) speculation about what might be in it, … Continue reading The Chancellor should continue to let the deficit take the strain

‘Global Britain’ shouldn’t be taking an axe to foreign aid

According to The Times, the Treasury is pressing for foreign aid to be cut temporarily from 0.7% of GDP to 0.5% as part of next Wednesday’s Spending Review. This would be both poor economics and dreadful politics. By way of background, the International Development Act of 2015 commits the government to spend 0.7% of national … Continue reading ‘Global Britain’ shouldn’t be taking an axe to foreign aid

Book review: “The Elephant in the Room” by John Mills

John Mills’ new book, The Elephant in the Room (published by Civitas and the John Mills Institute for Prosperity), leads with a dire warning that UK living standards may be lower in 2030 than in 2019, but counters this with the bold claim that the economy could grow sustainably by 3% to 4% a year instead, if … Continue reading Book review: “The Elephant in the Room” by John Mills

Why a tax on homeworking is a really bad idea…

Researchers at Deutsche Bank (DB) have proposed an additional tax on people working from home ‘to help those who cannot’. This would break just about every principle of good tax design and is one of the worst ideas I’ve ever heard. Let me explain... As I understand it, the proposal is for a 5% tax … Continue reading Why a tax on homeworking is a really bad idea…