About

I’m an independent economist with over thirty years of professional experience gained in the public sector, the City and consultancy, including senior positions at HM Treasury, HSBC, Standard Chartered Bank and Capital Economics.

Most recently, I was Chief Economist at the Institute of Economic Affairs, the educational charity and free-market think tank. I left that role in December 2018, but continue to support the work of the IEA, especially schools and university outreach, on a ‘pro bono’ basis. In addition I hold the honorary positions of IEA Economics Fellow and member of the IEA’s Academic Advisory Council.

Prior to joining the IEA, I was a Director, Chief Global Economist and Head of Commodities Research at the leading independent consultancy, Capital Economics, where I worked from 2004 to 2017. I regularly presented to clients across North America, Europe and Asia. I was also a leading member of the Capital Economics team, headed by Roger Bootle, which won the £250,000 Wolfson Economics Prize in 2012 (for the best plan to break up the euro).

I am a regular commentator in the media, including TV and radio, and write for a variety of websites, newspapers and magazines. I have also provided expert testimony on the UK’s departure from the EU to parliamentary select committees and been consulted on Brexit by the OBR.

I am now fortunate enough to be financially independent. All my educational, policy and social media activities are therefore unpaid. For the record, I still earn some income from writing and speaking engagements, but the sums are relatively small. I am not a member of any political party.

I graduated with a first class honours degree in Economics from Cambridge University (Clare College) in 1987 and have further qualifications in both economics (an MPhil) and law (the post-graduate diploma from the College of Law, gained when I was Head of Economics at what was then the Lord Chancellor’s Department).

In 2018, representing Cambridge, I won the annual ‘Clash of the Titans’ forecasting competition for professional economists, beating Dr Andrew Sentance (LSE) and Professor Patrick Minford (Oxford).