Category: NHS

Why economists should sit on SAGE

Throughout the pandemic, our politicians have been urged to “follow the science” or, more accurately, the advice provided by medical scientists. Other disciplines play only a bit part. There are Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) sub-groups assessing the impacts of Covid on the provision of social care, or minority ethnic groups, but what about … Continue reading Why economists should sit on SAGE

“Lies, damned lies, and statistics on NHS pay”

To be frank, I don’t have a strong view on what nurses should be paid, though I probably wouldn't begrudge them a bigger increase than 1%. Instead, this blog seeks to draw attention to some of the pitfalls in how others are presenting their case. For a start, it seems odd to make up your … Continue reading “Lies, damned lies, and statistics on NHS pay”

How more accurate data help to explain the relatively large fall in UK GDP

There is a lively debate among economists about the way in which UK statisticians are estimating the impact of Covid and the lockdown on the output of the public sector. This is a relatively arcane topic and the mainstream media can be forgiven for not yet covering it. But it is important, not least because … Continue reading How more accurate data help to explain the relatively large fall in UK GDP

Could the lockdown cost more lives than it saves?

The UK government’s daily coronavirus briefing on Friday drew more attention to a question that has already been troubling many people: could the wider economic and health impacts of the fight against Covid-19 actually do more harm than the virus itself? My view, for what it’s worth, is that it is right to err on … Continue reading Could the lockdown cost more lives than it saves?